Food Service Inspections

Print

What does the Health Inspection Score mean?
Inspection scores can range from 0 to 100 points, 100 being excellent. 100 points means no critical violations were seen at the time of the inspection.

To view the most recent Establishment Scores, please follow this link to our interactive site

What do Health Inspectors look for?
Health Inspectors look for "critical" and "non-critical" violations during inspections of food establishments.
Critical violations consist of improper cooking techniques or practices that could result in food related disease.

The first group of critical violations includes not re-heating food properly, not keeping food warm enough, not keeping food cold enough and not cooking food to appropriate temperatures. These violations result in points off on the inspection score.

The second group of critical violations includes other practices that could cause food borne illness. Examples of these violations are not washing hands properly, no soap or paper towels at the hand sinks, or improperly storing cleaning chemicals. These violations result in points off on the inspection score.

Non-critical violations are items that do not result in any points off but which must be corrected by the next regular inspection. Examples of such violations are walls, floors, or ceilings not being clean or in good repair. 

Food Handler Certification

City of Lewisville Code of Ordinances, Chapter 7, Article VII, Section 7-237 states in part:

  • Every person whose work brings him into contact with the handling of food, utensils, or food service equipment must possess a food handler's permit.
  • Every person who owns, manages, or otherwise controls any food service establishment shall not permit any person to be employed therein whose work brings him into contact with the handling of food, utensils or food service equipment who does not possess a valid food handler's permit within 45 days from the date of his employment. These permits shall be made available upon request by the city health division, therefore known as the regulatory health authority.
  • The owner/manager shall be responsible for the payment of the food handler's permits on a yearly basis.

** Many licensed programs offer both online and classroom food handler training.** 

Certified Food Manager

Each food establishment is required to have at least one person in charge for each shift that is responsible for supervising food preparation and has a valid Food Protection Management Training Certificate. The Certified Food Manager Class is offered at various locations throughout the state. A course registry of the Certified Food Manager Accredited Training Programs is available for review and downloading at the Texas Department of State Health Services web site.

See an example of our health inspection form.

To report a possible food-borne illness or unsanitary condition at a restaurant or other food service establishment, contact the Health Division, Monday - Friday, 7:30 a.m.  - 5:30 p.m. or on Friday from 7:30 - 11:30 a.m. To reach the Health Division staff by phone call 972.219.3480.

To report other health concerns visit our Customer Support Center and look for the Health Inspections box.

Free viewers are required for some of the attached documents.
They can be downloaded by clicking on the icons below.

Acrobat Reader Flash Player Windows Media Player Microsoft Silverlight Word Viewer Excel Viewer PowerPoint Viewer